Hikikomori

Documental – hikikomori, jovenes invisibles #ikikomori #hack

Hikikomori (ひきこもり or 引き籠もり Hikikomori?, literally “pulling inward, being confined”, i.e., “acute social withdrawal“) is a Japanese term to refer to the phenomenon of reclusive adolescents or young adults who withdraw from social life, often seeking extreme degrees of isolation and confinement. The term hikikomori refers to both the sociological phenomenon in general as well as to people belonging to this societal group.

The Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare defines hikikomori as people who refuse to leave their house and, thus, isolate themselves from society in their homes for a period exceeding six months.[1] The psychiatrist Tamaki Saitō defines hikikomori as “A state that has become a problem by the late twenties, that involves cooping oneself up in one’s own home and not participating in society for six months or longer, but that does not seem to have another psychological problem as its principal source.”[2] More recently, researchers have suggested six specific criteria required to “diagnose” hikikomori: 1) spending most of the day and nearly every day confined to home, 2) marked and persistent avoidance of social situations, 3) symptoms interfering significantly with the person’s normal routine, occupational (or academic) functioning, or social activities or relationships, 4) perceiving the withdrawal as ego-syntonic, 5) duration at least six months, and 6) no other mental disorder that accounts for the social withdrawal and avoidance.[3]

While the degree of the phenomenon varies on an individual basis, in the most extreme cases, some people remain in isolation for years or even decades. Often hikikomori start out as school refusals, or futōkō (不登校) in Japanese (an older term istōkōkyohi (登校拒否)). The Ministry of Health estimates that about 3,600,000 hikikomori live in Japan,[4] about one third of whom are aged 30 and older.

The Anatomy of Dependence (甘えの構造 Amae no kōzō?) is a non-fiction book written by Japanese psychoanalyst Takeo Doi which describes at length Doi’s concept of amae, which he describes as a uniquely Japanese need to be in good favor with, and be able to depend on, the people around oneself. He likens this to behaving childishly in the assumption that parents will indulge you (Doi 2001:16), and claims that the ideal relationship is that of the parent-child, and all other relationships should strive for this degree of closeness (Doi 2001:39).

Takeo Doi (土居 健郎 Doi Takeo?, March 17, 1920 – July 5, 2009) was a Japanese academicpsychoanalyst and author.[1]

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Hikikomori: Tokyo Plastic is a 2004 Japanese film, written and directed by Adario Strange.

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A young Japanese hacker from Tokyo named Naomi moves to New York, but then has to return for an experimental eye operation. She becomes friends with an attractive office lady called Izumi, and together they take Tokyo by storm. This does not last long and she finds herself resorting to old ways and starts illegally hacking. She is quickly swept up into a world she knows nothing of, a world of fear and crime, as one determined Hikikomori targets her, forcing her along a dangerous path, which puts herself, her family and her new best friend at grave risk.

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Is Amae the Key to Understanding Japanese Culture?

http://www.sociology.org/content/vol005.001/smith-nomi.html

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Stay Home Sakoku: The Hikikomori Project #hikikomori #EugeniaLim

Stay Home Sakoku: The Hikikomori Project is an introverted performance/installation exploring the Japanese phenomenon ofhikikomori or ‘shut in’ syndrome. Over one week, Lim will live in a bedroom-style installation within West Space. Although physically ‘on view’ to gallery goers, communication between herself and the outside world will occur via a web portal or ‘hiki-site’ through which people can chat with her via smartphones or home computers. Meals will be delivered and she will not leave or receive visitors for the entire week.

Hikikomori confine themselves to their rooms for months and, in extreme cases, years on end. Without physical contact, hikikomoriexist in isolation. Yet, many survive on a diet of pop culture and live a networked existence through an online community of forums, games and chatrooms. Increasingly, through our daily engagement with Web 2.0, we are all becoming networked beings. Stay Home is a project for anyone whose life intersects with technology and the Internet.

Project collaborators are Dan West, Yumi Umiumare and David Wolf. Stay Home Sakoku: The Hikikomori Project is part of the Today Your Love program, which is generously supported by the Australia Council. Eugenia Lim will inhabit the room for one week, however the installation will be on display until 14 April. Eugenia and her collaborators are supported by the Australia Council and City of Melbourne.

http://www.stayhomesakoku.com/

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Part of the Oasis body of work, Nest explores the Japanese phenomenon of hikikomori or ‘shut-in syndrome’. After experiencing a social trauma, hikikomori confine themselves to their bedrooms for days, months and in extreme cases, years on end, existing on a diet of anime, manga, gemu (video games), online chats and forums. Over one million hikikomori exist in Japan, with at least that number of family members supporting, feeding and clothing their reclusive (and typically male) child.

Nest references both the cocoon-like bedrooms of hikikomori and the Shinto myth of Amaterasu, the sun goddess, who plunged the world into darkness after retreating into a cave. Nest, features renowned Japanese butoh performer Yumi Umiumare who re-imagines a 21st century Amaterasu.

Director/concept: Eugenia Lim
Performer: Yumi Umiumare
Sound design: Dan West
Camera: Eugenia Lim, Alice Glenn, Paul Philipson
Lighting: Paul Philipson
Costume: Kat Chan
Art direction: Eugenia Lim

 


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