Ai Weiwei

Ai Weiwei Uses 1.2 Million LEGO Bricks to Portray 176 Political Prisoners and Exiles

Once an infamous prison, Alcatraz is now a national park that attracts 1.5 million visitors each year – and Chinese artist Ai Weiwei just teamed up with the FOR-SITE Foundation to unveil a series of 7 provocative installations that engage with the island’s history while exploring the issues of human rights and freedom of expression. “Trace” is one of the most spectacular – Ai Weiwei used 1.2 million LEGO bricks to create portraits of 176 prisoners of conscience and exiles. Today we took a firsthand look at this amazing installation before it officially opens this weekend – check out our photos after the jump!

Edward Snowden

Edward Snowden

 

Ai Weiwei Alcatraz

Ai Weiwei Alcatraz

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Obra de Ai  Weiwei

Obra de Ai Weiwei

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Introducing @Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz

Publicado el 13/5/2014

Artist and activist Ai Weiwei and others discuss the ideas behind “@Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz,” an exhibition of new work created for Alcatraz that raises urgent questions about human rights and freedom of expression. On view September 27, 2014-April 26, 2015. Learn more:http://AiWeiweiAlcatraz.org
“@Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz” is presented by the FOR-SITE Foundation in partnership with the National Park Service and the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy.

 


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Ai Weiwei installation shows his days in detention at #VeniceBiennale

This picture shows one of Chinese artist Ai Weiwei's dioramas contained into one of the six iron boxes part of his work presented as collateral event and shown during a press preview of the 55th edition of the Venice Biennale of Arts in Venice, northern Italy, Tuesday, May 28, 2013. The work on display is called S.A.C.R.E.D. The four initials standing for supper, accuser, cleansing, ritual, entropy and doubt, and referring to Ai Weiwei time 81 days in detention in 2011. Chinese artist Ai Weiwei has been prevented by Chinese authorities from traveling to Venice for the opening of two new works on the sidelines of the Biennale contemporary art show, so his mother came instead. Weiwei's elderly mother, Gao Yng, on Tuesday viewed for the first time a series of dioramas depicting six episodes of pressure during her son's 81 days in detention in 2011. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)

This picture shows one of Chinese artist Ai Weiwei’s dioramas contained into one of the six iron boxes part of his work presented as collateral event and shown during a press preview of the 55th edition of the Venice Biennale of Arts in Venice, northern Italy, Tuesday, May 28, 2013. The work on display is called S.A.C.R.E.D. The four initials standing for supper, accuser, cleansing, ritual, entropy and doubt, and referring to Ai Weiwei time 81 days in detention in 2011. Chinese artist Ai Weiwei has been prevented by Chinese authorities from traveling to Venice for the opening of two new works on the sidelines of the Biennale contemporary art show, so his mother came instead. Weiwei’s elderly mother, Gao Yng, on Tuesday viewed for the first time a series of dioramas depicting six episodes of pressure during her son’s 81 days in detention in 2011. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)

 

Whether he was sleeping, eating, taking a shower or defecating, dissident Chinese artist Ai Weiwei spent 81 days under close surveillance by two uniformed guards in a windowless cell two years ago, not knowing his fate.

The memory of those days is what Ai showed the world yesterday in a monumental installation entitled S.A.C.R.E.D., unveiled at the historic church of Sant’Antonin in Venice ahead of the city’s biennale, which will open to the public on Saturday.

Ai’s mother, Gao Ying, broke down in tears after touring her son’s installation. “I am very sad,” she said.

Ai Weiwei

Ai Weiwei

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http://www.labiennale.org/en/biennale/index.html

SACRED

SACRED

AI WEIWEI RELEASES NEW ALBUM “THE DIVINE COMEDY”

LA DIVINA COMEDIA by Dante A

Ai Weiwei

Ai Weiwei

AI WEIWEI RELEASES MUSIC VIDEO “CHAOYANG PARK”

AIFLOWERS

AIFLOWER

AIFLOWER

RESPECT LIFE, NEVER FORGET #AIFLOWERS

Ai Weiwei

Ai Weiwei is an artist and a social activist. His work encompasses diverse fields including fine arts, curating, architecture, and social criticism. Born in Beijing in 1957, he moved to Xinjiang with his family between 1960 and 1976. Subsequently he relocated to the United States in 1981 and lived there until 1993. He currently resides and works in Beijing.

On April 3, 2011, Ai was secretly detained by the police for 81 days at the Beijing Capital International Airport while on his way to board a flight to Hong Kong. He was released on bail on June 22, 2011 upon fabricated tax charges. Although the bail was lifted after a year, the authorities have not returned his passport and he remains prohibited from travelling outside China.

In collaboration with Herzog & de Meuron, Ai Weiwei designed the 2012 Serpentine Pavilion in London, UK. Among numerous awards and honors, he won the Václav Havel Prize for Creative Dissent from the Human Rights Foundation in 2012, and was selected as Honorary Academician at the Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK in 2011.

His major solo exhibitions include Ai Weiwei: According to What? at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C. (2012), Ai Weiwei: Absent at the Taipei Fine Arts Museum, Taipei, Taiwan (2011), Circle of Animals at the Pulitzer Fountain, New York, NY (2011), Interlacing at Fotomuseum Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland (2011), The Unilever Series: Ai Weiwei at the Tate Modern, London, UK (2010), So Sorry at Haus der Kunst, Munich, Germany (2009), and Ai Weiwei: New York Photographs 1983-1993 at Three Shadows Photography Art Center, Beijing (2009).

The Arrest of Ai Weiwei in London

Ai Weiwei

Ai Weiwei

Howard Brenton’s #aiww: The Arrest of Ai Weiwei draws on conversations between the Chinese artist with British journalist Barnaby Martin about Ai’s imprisonment in 2011.

The hashtag in the title is a reference to Mr Ai’s prolific use of the social networking site Twitter, where he has more than 200,000 followers.

After he was released, the government claimed that his 81-day imprisonment related to tax evasion.

The play, directed by James Macdonald, stars Benedict Wong as Ai Weiwei.

The BBC’s Tim Masters spoke to the playwright Howard Brenton following on opening night at Hampstead Theatre in London.

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#aiww ..THE ARREST OF AI WEIWEI.

Arrest of Ai Weiwei play has world premiere in London

Ai Weiwei London

Ai Weiwei London

Arrest of Ai Weiwei

Arrest of Ai Weiwei

THE Twitter account of Ai Weiwei, China’s foremost artist-activist, fell silent when he was arrested on April 3rd. Chinese state media suggest that he is guilty of “economic crimes” and a bevy of other reputation-killers such as plagiarism and being “erratic.” But his imprisonment is clearly a means of shutting him up. A forceful advocate of democracy and free speech, Mr Ai used his blog to confront the fictions of government propaganda. With belligerent conviction, he railed against the inhumanity of a regime with no respect for the truth.

“Twitter is most suitable for me. In the Chinese language, 140 characters is a novella,” says Mr Ai in an interview at the back of “Ai Weiwei’s Blog“, a collection of over a hundred translated pieces culled from over 2,700 posts. Mr Ai’s father, Ai Qing, was a poet who was deemed an enemy of the state in 1957, rehabilitated only when the Cultural Revolution died down in 1976. But Mr Ai had written very little himself. In fact, the visual artist barely knew how to type when he was invited by Sina, China’s largest internet portal, to write a blog for their website.

via: http://www.economist.com/blogs/prospero/2011/04/ai_weiweis_blog

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354235

 

On 3 April 2011, as he was boarding a flight to Taipei, the Chinese Artist Ai Weiwei was arrested at Beijing Airport. Advised merely that his travel “could damage state security”, he was escorted to a van by officials after which he disappeared for 81 days. On his release, the government claimed that his imprisonment related to tax evasion.

Howard Brenton’s new play is based on recent conversations with Ai in which he told the story of that imprisonment – by turns surreal, hilarious, and terrifying. A portrait of the Artist in extreme conditions, it is also an affirmation of the centrality of Art and of freedom of speech in civilised society.

http://www.officiallondontheatre.co.uk/london-shows/show/item175417/aiww-the-arrest-of-ai-weiwei/

Fotos libros 064 - copia

 

The Crab House 《河蟹房子》by Ai Weiwei

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Early in 2008, the district government of Jiading, Shanghai invited Ai Weiwei to build a studio in Malu Township, as a part of the local government’s efforts in developing its cultural assets. By August 2010, the Ai Weiwei Shanghai Studio completed all of its construction work. In October 2010, the Shanghai government declared the Ai Weiwei Shanghai Studio an illegal construction, and was subjected to demolition. On November 7, 2010, when Ai Weiwei was placed under house arrest by public security in Beijing, over 1,000 netizens attended the “River Crab Feast” at the Shanghai Studio.
On January 11, 2011, the Shanghai city government forcibly demolished the Ai Weiwei Studio within a day, without any prior notice.

Publicado el 06/11/2012 por 

2008年,上海市嘉定区政府邀请艾未未前往上海马陆镇建立工作室,作为当地政府发展文化产业的一部分。2010年8月,艾未未上海工作室全部建设完工,上海政府称艾未未­上海工作室为违章建筑,必须拆除。2010年11月7日,艾未未被警方软禁在北京,1千多名网友前往上海工作室参加”河蟹宴”。
2011年1月11日,上海市政府未通知艾未未工作室,将工作室在一天之中强拆。

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So Sorry

As a sequel to Ai Weiwei’s film Lao Ma Ti Hua, the film So Sorry (named after the artist’s 2009 exhibition in Munich, Germany) shows the beginnings of the tension between Ai Weiwei and the Chinese Government. In Lao Ma Ti Hua, Ai Weiwei travels to Chengdu, China to attend the trial of the civil rights advocate Tan Zuoren, as a witness. In So Sorry, you see the investigation led by Ai Weiwei studio to identify the students who died during the Sichuan earthquake as a result of corruption and poor building constructions leading to the confrontation between Ai Weiwei and the Chengdu police. After being beaten by the police, Ai Weiwei traveled to Munich, Germany to prepare his exhibition at the museum, Haus der Kunst. The result of his beating led to intense headaches caused by a brain hemorrhage and was treated by emergency surgery. These events mark the beginning of Ai Weiwei’s struggle and surveillance at the hands of the state police.


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http://vimeo.com/40648828  <<<<<<<<<PLAY