Have you ever retired a human by mistake? #BladeRunner

Rachel NEXUS 6 Polaroid Self Portrait by Sean Young

Rachel NEXUS 6 Polaroid Self Portrait by Sean Young

 

Rachael is the latest experiment of Eldon Tyrell. Tyrell believes that as the replicants have such a limited lifespan, they have little time to develop control of their emotions, causing difficulty managing them. He believes implanting them with memories would create a cushion which would allow for emotional development, and make them more controllable.

Rachael has the implanted memories of Tyrell’s niece, and she is led to believe that she is human. It is not revealed in the film how long she has been living, but Tyrell admits that he thinks she is beginning to suspect the truth of her existence.

When Rachael learns the truth, she is ignored by Tyrell. In desperation, she turns to Deckard, who has been told by Captain Bryant to retire her. He eventually falls in love with her.

Both of them are allowed to live: Roy saves Deckard from falling off a building, and Gaff does not kill Rachael. Gaff leaves his calling card, an origami model (this time, shaped like a foil unicorn) at Deckard’s apartment to show he’s been there. At the end of the film, she and Deckard flee from his apartment to go into hiding.

In Blade Runner 2: The Edge of Human, she is kept within a Tyrell transport that slows down her aging process located in an isolated shack outside of Los Angeles. Near the end of the novel, Sarah Tyrell, who is Eldon’s niece and Rachael’s template, brings her to Tyrell headquarters in order to meet up with Deckard and allowed to flee. However, it is ultimately learned that Rachael is killed by Tyrell agents while Sarah and Deckard escape, allowing Sarah to reclaim her place as Tyrell’s niece.

Played by Sean Young.

Polaroid's by Sean Young

Polaroid’s by Sean Young

brpolaroid2 brpolaroid3

List of Blade Runner characters:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Blade_Runner_characters

Blade Runner is a 1982 American dystopian science fiction thriller film directed by Ridley Scott and starring Harrison FordRutger HauerSean Young and Edward James Olmos. The screenplay, written by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples, is loosely based on the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.

The film depicts a dystopian Los Angeles in November 2019 in which genetically engineered organic robots called replicants—visually indistinguishable from adult humans—are manufactured by the powerful Tyrell Corporation as well as by other “mega-corporations” around the world. Their use on Earth is banned and replicants are exclusively used for dangerous, menial or leisure work on off-world colonies. Replicants who defy the ban and return to Earth are hunted down and “retired” by police special operatives known as “Blade Runners”. The plot focuses on a desperate group of recently escaped replicants hiding in Los Angeles and the burnt-out expert Blade Runner, Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), who reluctantly agrees to take on one more assignment to hunt them down.

Blade Runner initially polarized critics: some were displeased with the pacing, while others enjoyed its thematic complexity. The film performed poorly in North American theaters but has since become acult film.[2] It has been hailed for its production design, depicting a “retrofitted” future,[3] and remains a leading example of the neo-noir genre.[4] It brought the work of Philip K. Dick to the attention of Hollywood and several later films were based on his work.[5] Ridley Scott regards Blade Runner as “probably” his most complete and personal film.[6][7] In 1993, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Seven versions of the film have been shown for various markets as a result of controversial changes made by film executives. A rushed Director’s Cut was released in 1992 after a strong response toworkprint screenings. This, in conjunction with its popularity as a video rental, made it one of the first films released on DVD, resulting in a basic disc with mediocre video and audio quality.[8] In 2007,Warner Bros. released The Final Cut, a 25th anniversary digitally remastered version by Scott in select theaters, and subsequently on DVD, HD DVD, and Blu-ray Disc.[9]

Blade_Runner_poster

Blade_Runner_poster

The Blade Runner soundtrack was composed by Vangelis for Ridley Scott‘s 1982 film Blade Runner. It is mostly a dark, melodic combination of classical composition and synthesizers which mirrors the futuristic film noir envisioned by Scott. Since the premiere of the film, two official albums have been released containing music omitted from the film and also new compositions featuring a similar style. An orchestral rendition of part of the soundtrack was released in 1982 by the New American Orchestra. However, the original soundtrack album (1994) features vocal contributions from Demis Roussos and the sax solo by Dick Morrissey on “Love Theme” (In the credits on page 3 of the 1994 Atlantic CD, Dick’s last name is misspelled as “Morrisey”). The track “Memories of Green” from Vangelis’ 1980 albumSee You Later was also included. A new release made in 2007 includes a disc of new music inspired by the film.


#

Scene from «Blade Runner».

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s