A Time-Lapse Map of Every Nuclear Explosion Since 1945 – by Isao Hashimoto

Japanese artist Isao Hashimoto has created a beautiful, undeniably scary time-lapse map of the 2053 nuclear explosions which have taken place between 1945 and 1998, beginning with the Manhattan Project’s “Trinity” test near Los Alamos and concluding with Pakistan’s nuclear tests in May of 1998. This leaves out North Korea’s two alleged nuclear tests in this past decade (the legitimacy of both of which is not 100% clear).

Each nation gets a blip and a flashing dot on the map whenever they detonate a nuclear weapon, with a running tally kept on the top and bottom bars of the screen. Hashimoto, who began the project in 2003, says that he created it with the goal of showing”the fear and folly of nuclear weapons.” It starts really slow — if you want to see real action, skip ahead to 1962 or so — but the buildup becomes overwhelming.

http://www.ctbto.org/specials/1945-19…

“1945-1998” BY ISAO HASHIMOTO

Multimedia artwork

“2053” – This is the number of nuclear explosions conducted in various parts of the globe.*

Profile of the artist: Isao HASHIMOTO

Born in Kumamoto prefecture, Japan in 1959.

Worked for 17 years in financial industry as a foreign exchange dealer. Studied at Department of Arts, Policy and Management of Musashino Art University, Tokyo.

Currently working for Lalique Museum, Hakone, Japan as a curator.

Created artwork series expressing, in the artist’s view, “the fear and the folly of nuclear weapons”:

  1. “1945-1998” © 2003
  2. “Overkilled”
  3. “The Names of Experiments”

About “1945-1998” ©2003

“This piece of work is a bird’s eye view of the history by scaling down a month length of time into one second.  No letter is used for equal messaging to all viewers without language barrier.  The blinking light, sound and the numbers on the world map show when, where and how many experiments each country have conducted.  I created this work for the means of an interface to the people who are yet to know of the extremely grave, but present problem of the world.”

Contact the artist:

Should you have any query regarding this artwork, please contact  e-mail address below:

hashi123@amy.hi-ho.ne.jp

* The number excludes the announced nuclear tests by North Korea.

37e3dc719f

37e3dc719f

 

 

Isao Hashimoto

Japanese artist from Tokyo, who has worked as a financier for 17 years, who in the end became an oppositionist of the present system. Born in Kumamoto prefecture, Japan in 1959. After 17 years of working in financial industry as a foreign exchange dealer, studied at Department of Arts, Policy and Management of Musashino Art University, Tokyo.

Currently also working for Lalique Museum, Hakone, Japan as a curator.

Artwork series expressing the fear and the folly of nuclear weapons: 1945-1998 ,Overkilled , The Names of the Experiments  Main exhibitions: To the Human Future – Flight from the Dark Side  at Mito Art Center (Ibaragi,Japan) Feb to May, 2006 1945-1998 was designated as a permanent archives in CTBTO (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization, Vienna, Austria) Jan 2009 Since 2009, 1945-1998  appears on the Homepage of CTBTO, and also permanently exhibited at the ground floor of the institute.Putting an End to Nuclear Explositons  at United Nations headquarters (New York,USA) May 2010 City Net Asia 2011  at Seoul Museum of Art (Seoul, Korea) Sept to Nov 2011

The festival will showcase his work: The name of experiments  and 1945-1998 .

Isao-Hashimoto_reference

Isao-Hashimoto_reference

1945-1998, The names of the experiments

Isao Hashimoto

1945-1998 (2003) 2053  – This is the number of nuclear explosions conducted in various parts of the globe. The first nuclear test was conducted in July 1945 in the desert of New Mexico, USA.

Soon after that, the atomic bombs were consecutively dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and ever since then the tests have been repeated to a total of 2053 times until the year 1998. Until early 1960’s, most tests were carried out in the atmosphere causing massive radioactive contamination. In 1963, the United States, Soviet Union and Great Britain signed Partial Test Ban Treaty  to resort to underground testing, but France and China continued to conduct tests on the ground. Then, as the anti-nuclear movements gained more strength, the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) was finally put into effect. It is an agreement to reduce the possibility of a nuclear war by denying the increase of the countries which possess nuclear weapons. Following this, in 1996 the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty  was adopted, and by 1998 all nuclear tests accompanying nuclear explosions were banned. However, ignoring the criticism by the international community, the United States and Russia still continue to conduct sub-critical nuclear experiments that do not cause nuclear explosions. This piece of work is a bird’s eye view of the history by scaling down a month length of time into one second. No letter is used for equal messaging to all viewers without language barrier. The blinking light, sound and the numbers on the world map show when, where and how many experiments each country has conducted. I created this work for the means of an interface to the people who are yet to know of the extremely grave, but present problem of the world. *The number excludes the tests done by North Korea October 2006 and May 2009. Overkilled (2005) This piece of work aims for the audience to experience the number of nuclear bombs that exist in the world (as of January 2005) by both audio and visual. The first two drops of toy bullet on the tinplate represent the bombs dropped in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and let the audience know that those 2 bombs already have killed thousands of people. And then, all at once drop the number of nuclear bombs that exist in the world now, which total up to more than 13 times of the number of nuclear tests with explosion conducted so far.

Hasimoto

Hasimoto

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